What is Medicaid

What is Medicaid?

Medicaid is a part of healthcare insurance in the United States that is a federal and state program that provides help for individuals with limited income and resources for their medical expenses. This form of healthcare insurance provides coverage that is not usually covered under Medicare, such as nursing home and personal care services. Medicaid is a government insurance program for individuals with all ages whose income is in limited status and insufficient resources to cover their medical expenses.  As of now, Medicaid is the largest fund for medical and health services for individuals with low-income status in the U.S. States are using financial eligibility guidelines to know whether an individual is eligible for Medicaid coverage. 

What does Medicaid Cover?

Medicaid is designed to cover the basic healthcare needs of lower-income families in America. Most every state has numerous Medicaid programs, these programs cover pregnant, elderly, disabled,  a parent or a child. In addition, if you make less than 133% of the FPL, there’s a program for you, depending on your state Medicaid under Obamacare.

A. Coverage for Pregnant Women Under Medicaid

Women that are pregnant are covered for all healthcare services related to pregnancy, delivery and any complications that may occur during the stage of pregnancy and up to 60 days postpartum. Pregnant women ate generally a priority in determining eligibility for Medicaid programs. Most offices try their best to qualify a pregnant woman within 2-4 weeks.

B. Coverage for Children Under Medicaid

Medicaid is designed to cover the basic healthcare needs of lower-income families in America. Most every state has numerous Medicaid programs, these programs cover pregnant, elderly, disabled,  a parent or a child. In addition, if you make less than 133% of the FPL, there’s a program for you, depending on your state Medicaid under Obamacare.

How Medicaid Eligibility is Determined?

Determining if you are eligible under the Medicaid program is by modified adjusted gross income, which is the taxable income, in addition to certain deductions. The deductions include non-taxable Social security benefits, individual retirement contributions, and tax-exempt interest. Modified adjusted gross income is identical to your adjusted taxable income, which can be found on your tax return. Particular income requirements in an amount that rises alongside the size of your household.

How to Apply Medicaid?

If you are eligible for Medicaid, you can apply through your state’s Medicaid website or the federal health insurance marketplace. If you’re going to apply for Medicaid through Healthcare.gov, and you are qualified the federal government will notify your state agency and will contact you regarding the enrollment. In completing your application, you will typically provide documentation that your states require.

The Application may Include the Following Document;

  • Birth certificate or Driver’s license as proof of your age and citizenship
  • Tax returns serve as an income proof
  • Bill statements or copy of your mortgage as proof of your address
  • Medical records, as proof of disability

Medicaid Vs. Medicare

Most people struggle to understand what is the difference between Medicaid and Medicare. Medicaid and Medicare are both created in 1965 to cover the inability of older and low-income citizens of Americans in buying private healthcare insurance. There are differences between Medicaid and Medicare, though many citizens might be eligible for both programs. Medicaid is a state and federal program the gives wide range of healthcare coverage to all people that have a very low-income. On the other hand, Medicare is a federal program that gives healthcare coverage at the age of 65 or older or has a disability, regardless of the level of income status is. Medicaid is funded by both the Federal government and State governments.

Mandatory Benefits of Medicaid

It is a requirement for every state to provide mandatory Medicaid benefits under federal law.

  • Outpatient Hospital Services
  • Inpatient Hospital Services
  • Nursing Facility Services
  • Home Health Services
  • Rural Health Clinic Services
  • Physician Services
  • Laboratory and X-ray Services
  • Nurse Midwife Services
  • Family Planning Services
  • Transportation to Medical Care
  • Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment Services

Optional Medicaid Benefits

Medicaid program also provides coverage for multiple optional services. States have the power to choose the optional Medicaid services.

  • Clinic Services
  • Physical Therapy
  • Prescription Drugs
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Respiratory Care Services
  • Podiatry Services
  • Medicaid dental Coverage
  • Eyeglasses
  • Dentures
  • Personal care

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